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Education Learning

Literate vs Well-Educated

Literate vs Well-Educated is a phrase I commonly use when insulting my friends, but despite the low-hanging insult fruit, this phrase does carry a lot of weight.

Now, yes there is a basic difference between being Literate and being Well-Educated. For the sake of this article, I am going to break down the Literate vs Well-Educated debate right here and use the rest of this article as an explanation for it.

What does being Literate and Educated mean?

A Literate is someone who possesses the ability to read and write, while an Educated is a person who has acquired knowledge and skill. People often use the two words interchangeably and with reason since they do have a few similarities.

Literate vs Well-Educated:The Link

Both literacy and education require hard work and persistence, and you need both to become a functioning part of society.

Literacy gives you the tools that you will need to gain more information from the world by being able to communicate with teachers who will teach you more. Education is what these teachers will provide.

Literacy gives access to Education—a person who is not literate will have a hard time become educated.

However, it is worthy to note that you can acquire Education without Literacy; considering the fact that education is more than meets the eye.

What is Education?

Let’s get this out of the way; education is not just about your books. Learning a sport or how to use some equipment is also education. Literacy is important since you need to be able to understand the person who is teaching you.

However, it is very much possible to become well-educated without becoming literate.

Education, in a greater sense, is the development of the being whereas Literacy is a part of Education itself.

Here is an example article of unconventional but important education.

Literate vs Well-Educated: An Easy Example

A very simple example is the best way to illustrate the Literate vs Well-Educated debate. A literate can read news articles on corruption, extortion, lynching, etc., but only an educated person understands why it is wrong.

We often refer to teachers as Educators, yes even your English teachers. This is so because they educated you to become literate, enforcing my point that literacy is a step towards Education.

Why Education?

A lot of crimes happen simply due to a lack of Education. People who do not know any better, try to do what they think is best for them.

People who do not know any better often make bad/uninformed choices which only lead to negative circumstances that hurt everyone involved.

This is why education is important because it teaches us about morality and altruism; it informs us on how we can be happy. Education is a person’s journey towards differentiating right from wrong.

Education is, therefore, about becoming a Human.

The Different Kinds of Education

You can divide Education is into, several different classes. Becoming a scientist means you are educated, but becoming a public speaker is also, in a sense, the same.

The way I see it, Education is when you acquire knowledge along with the ability to apply this knowledge for the benefit of everyone [No, cheating in Exams is still not cool].

For example: If you learn a mathematical equation and are able to apply that equation beyond just the questions in the book, that make you educated.

A different side of Education is the previously-discussed human element. Think of it this way. What is the point of being educated if you do not use your education to improve yourself and others around you?

I like to believe that this mindset is the reason that we think of Education so highly. We all want improvement but not everyone is capable of improving on their own. That is why the educated person gets so much importance.

I just feel that, at some point, we confused the words educated and literate.

The Different Kinds of Literacy

Literacy also has different kinds; again, not easy to differentiate, unfortunately.

Looking at it from far away, literacy seems to be associated with having exclusively bookish knowledge of facts without having any associated knowledge towards it.

Use that as an insult for that one friend who is extremely good at trivia; we all have one.

Literacy is a tool; you need to be literate to read a novel but educated to understand what the author is trying to convey. Let us come back to the Math problem example.

 If you know a formula but do not know how to use it beyond just what the book teaches, it is pointless in the grand scheme of things to know a formula like that. Schools generally have an imbalance where they teach you to be literate more than educated.

You might have a degree but if you do not put it to use beyond wearing it like a badge of honor, then there is no point. Remember that most jobs require an educated person rather than a literate person; since you need the ability to dynamically apply the knowledge you have.

Literacy is also often associated with cramming information. Here is a great article that takes a deep dive into the world of cramming.

Conclusion

The conclusion is clear folks, I am pretty sure you can derive a few good insults at least from this article but yeah.

We should Strive to be Educated, to paraphrase a great movie.

Do not run after success; run after Excellence.

3 idiots

Of course, my article on its own might not convince you, so here is another article of the same to help you for an opinion.

In a world like ours, we/you need to be educated, simply because education teaches us to be human. What do you think? Safe Travels Friend.

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Develpoment Education Learning

Paperless Education- The New Future of Learning?

Adapting to technology doesn’t necessarily mean inconveniencing oneself in the name of development. This is perhaps the biggest concern of educators all over the globe. The reluctance to adopt a paperless education method stems from multiple reasons; all of which might be justifiable. But the fact remains—technology was developed by humans to simplify tasks in their daily life. Therefore, paperless education is gaining popularity in the field of learning.

What is Paperless Education?

When one talks of paperless education, the direct ideas that pop in one’s mind are perhaps difficult to grade papers, a lack of practice of penmanship, and an overall reduction in the growth of aptitude. Old-school educators feel that if they let technology invade education like it has invaded other aspects of a human’s life, they’ll hamper learning. But is this fear valid? Let’s do what is done best in such daunting situations—create a Pros and Cons list!

Pros of Adapting Paperless Education

As an advocate of the healthy use of technology, paperless education is the revolution in education we urgently need to adapt. And the reasons for this urgency is listed below:

1. Going Paperless Means Easier Track of Learning

Paperless education makes tracking easier
Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

In every aspect of human life, we’ve let technology help us. Be it accounting, record keeping, data tracking, or any other tasks that were tedious as hell five decades ago. Nobody can deny the efficiency and accuracy it has granted us. Students deserve to learn through the same level of efficiency that the current era runs on.

Converting the system of learning, even gradually, to accommodate the paperless vision of education can mean that a great level of efficiency can be achieved. Just imagine the time, effort, and energy it is going to save if every essential teaching and learning resource, administration, execution, and feedback, come together through a systematic interface.

The quality of learning and education is dramatically going to improve, and the progress will be evident. Oh, one thing that perhaps is the biggest pro for teachers is that, with paperless education, no students can go on with the excuse that they forgot their homework back at home! (oops)

2. Efficiency in Cutting Costs and Reducing Staff Work Load

Bulks of copies of worksheets, assignments, heaps of books, references and sheets, and about any other resource that uses paper. Therefore, education requires money. These are regular in today’s learning system. But imagine reducing all that and storing it all in one single digital space. Calculate the amount of extra money and costs that would be cut down by making this simple transition for paperless education.

Paperless education makes teaching easier
Photo by CoWomen on Unsplash

Teachers all over the globe have a singular common complaint. Too many students and too few teachers. The teachers have a tremendous workload and average pay. Now going paperless would significantly reduce the extra work that a teacher has to go through, like preparing copies, collecting assignments, etc. This undoubtedly would add to improved quality in learning, as the teachers would finally have time to focus on what’s important—imparting education.   

3. Promoting A Sustainable Learning Environment (My Favorite Pro Ngl)

Just think back to all the stacks of paper you’ve used in the past month for your schoolwork. Now multiply that to the thousands of students in your school and even more in your city. The amount of paper being used, printouts lying forgotten, assignments reviewed and stacked away, is a growing point of concern. The way we are moving forward is if we don’t work out a more sustainable mode of learning and of living, humans aren’t going to have much to live on with.

Going paperless will not only help you reduce your carbon footprint and do your bit for the environment, but it will also encourage students. Students who are leading towards a future where resources have already been plundered, and the need for sustainability will be at an all-time high.

4. Changing the Teacher-Student Dynamics (But in A Good Way)

Paperless education changes teach student dynamic
Photo by Xin Wang on Unsplash

A typical traditional classroom setup has been pretty similar for centuries. A professor or teacher or educator is leading the class, with students as attentive (and not so attentive) subjects. This system is religiously being followed to date, with some minuscule changes to it.

But gradually, as individuals and generations have grown, its effectiveness is seemingly reducing. The reason? The current generation doesn’t seem to thrive under the thumb of authority; they need the freedom and space to be expressive. For that reason, the teaching styles and patterns of teachers are gradually evolving.

Through paperless learning, a teacher wouldn’t necessarily have to be at the centre of the class. They can delegate students and at times, learn alongside them, as well. It can be visible that letting technology take over is not always a bad thing, especially if it assists in a more progressive style of receiving education.   

Cons of Going with Paperless Education

Everything that seems to have unbeatable pros do have a trail of cons that follow. How significant and difficult they are to work around, I’ll let you be the judge of it.

1. Affording the Conversion from Traditional to Paperless

In a lot of countries across the globe, classroom education has seen a significant improvement in terms of technology. The use of projectors, white screens, computers, and other electronic gadgets have been slowly yet gradually been introduced to the patterns of learning. But on the other hand, some do not have the funding necessary for going through such a major transformation. There are a vast majority of institutions in economically backward countries that have students who barely can afford books to study.

The polarization is extreme, I agree, but also necessary to consider. Unless extreme philanthropists are lurking around to sponsor millions of these kids with technology to go paperless, the paper would pretty much remain their medium to study. Sometimes, in our glory of privilege, we fail to acknowledge others who do not share similar opportunities as us. Therefore, to them, as titillating as paperless education sounds, it can’t be a possible reality.

2. Making Your Brain Lazy by Taking Too Much Help from Technology

Oh, if it isn’t the favourite argument by almost every boomer educationist out there—too much dependency on technology has made your brain lazy. They aren’t wrong on that aspect, are they? This is the same brain that used to memorize phone numbers a few times after dialling them. We were experts at roads and directions because Google Maps wasn’t an alternative in case we got lost. So now that we study ourselves, we cannot deny the fact that we indeed are turning into comfort-loving beings that dumps all the hard work on technology.

Now, in such times, the only solace was the training our brains get in the formative schooling years. Through vigorous learning and practising everything in real-time, at least in the developmental stage, students are learning to exercise their brains. With dependency on technology, we won’t have even that.      

3. Constant Need of Active and Dedicated Tech Staff in Institutions

This one’s a no-brainer. If you need to smoothly work out day-to-day school interactions with paperless education, then your altercations with technology will be a lot. The resolution of most technical errors requires the help of some qualified IT professionals. This means hiring full-time staff dedicated to handling the technology in the school. At present, most schools that have ‘smart classes’ (a projector, computer, and a screen) might have someone on the payroll to ensure that the tech is up-to-date.

Can hamper learning if tech fails
Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

But when transforming into an entirely paperless system of education, dependency on this technology increases tenfold. This means that if for any reason the tech fails, it will hamper the learning for an entire day. To avoid that, technological reinforcements are necessary, and that means more investment. It ultimately looks like a vicious loop.

Summing Up

Do the pros outweigh the cons? Or does paperless education have too many cons to consider it as a viable option? I’ll let you be the judge of that. What I do know is that nothing is constant, especially the world around us. Education will keep progressing and the methods of learning will evolve. How we take up to that change and adapt to it is the real question. Education essentially needs to be relevant for it to be effective for the coming generations. But the process of imbibing that relevancy needs to be easy and accessible with a wide variety of communities, cultures, and people. And that is something that shall be the defining factor for the quest for paperless education.

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Current Affairs Education General

The Reservation System: A Disgrace or A Necessity?

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Reservation systems occur in various countries like Nepal, India, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. It is available in slightly modified forms in MANY other countries—the policy of affirmative action in the USA, Brazil’s vestibular policy, quotas for Swedish speakers in Finland, and so on. The idea behind all these initiatives is pretty much the same. They aim to give racially discriminated groups additional numbers in order to ensure equal representation. 

What is the reservation system?

Reservation is a system meant to provide historically disadvantaged groups representation in education, employment, and politics. It involves a process of reserving a certain percentage of seats for certain groups perceived as availing lesser opportunities than those more privileged. It aims to empower them and ensure their participation in the decision-making of various important sectors. 

Putting the reservation system into perspective 

Let’s say you want to read more about the implications of the reservation system. Or about the green star. What would you do? Maybe run a quick search on any search engine, read TutorHere blogs, or the likes.

What if your internet is down? Maybe a quick run to the nearest café. And if you live in an area not very technologically advanced, maybe a pit stop at the library to read up on it. Either way, you use to access resources more easily available to you. 

Growing up, not all learners have access to the same amount of resources. Some have access to resources that have very little (or even no) value, as such. Some individuals from these disadvantaged communities come from homes that aren’t used to dreaming or having goals. Homes were becoming a doctor or an engineer seems like a dream just too good to be true. Or they just struggle due to a general bias against them in a specific society. 

Enter the reservation system. 

The reservation system sets aside a specific quota for these groups. Or takes these disadvantages into account so as to give them more opportunities. However, the big debate revolving around this is if it takes away the merit from ‘merit’. 

Researvation: A discredit to merit? 

The criticism against the reservation system has a few points of argument. To quickly break this down and give you an overview, the reasons include: 

  • Reservations generally benefit just a small fraction of the groups intended to benefit from it 
  • They tend to make these groups feel inferior, less motivated to work hard to achieve their goals, and create animosity between the groups that don’t have a reserved quota 
  • It perpetuates division and further makes the demarcation against these groups clearer 

Summing up, the argument against reservation focuses on the fact that trying to provide opportunities to support certain groups is in turn, fueling this division that disadvantaged them in the first place. It also gives room for politics to come into play and create animosity from those who have a higher merit score but can not get a seat. 

Reservation: An opportunity to dream? 

There are also quite a few points speaking for the reservation. And a brief look at these include: 

  • The reservation system quotas aren’t filled with those meant to benefit from it. Thus, this could be a sign that we need to work on the system
  • This protects the supported groups from privatisation of educational institutions and contractualisation of employment 
  • Reservation systems helps the social and psychological integration of these various groups 
  • Reservation is merely an entry criterion and does not compromise on performance of the individual 

Overall, it’s an argument that privilege stops us from really understanding what the reservation system is aiming for. Studies also show that “gains in learning are higher in elite institutions compared to non-elite institutions.” So while the reservation system may not be the solution to discrimination, it could be a temporary makeshift until we can improve our systems of education to ensure everyone has access to equal resources. 

reservation as an opportunity
Photo by Alexis Brownon Unsplash 

Conclusion 

Many countries still continue to debate the implications of the reservation system. While some struggle to keep it in place, others think it to be a disgrace to economic progress. However, the question is, if the economic progress is substantially benefitting all (Read more on the importance of education for all, here).

As usual, the takeaways from this article are entirely yours. What’s the verdict? The reservation system – A disgrace to modern society or a necessary plow to even the playing field? 

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Education

Grades: Dictators hiding in disguise

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Schools, colleges, or any educational institution, including coaching classes play a pretty crucial role in all of our lives. Those are the grounds where a lot of ideas and concepts come into light; we form our opinions, base judgments, our morals and ethics build a foundation, catch up on gossip, etc. But what does education have in common no matter the level of it?

Grades, as mentioned in the title (If you guessed something different, I’d like to guess what you guessed).

Ughh grades..?

Each human being on this planet is familiar with the concept, use, importance, and aftermath of grades. I think even your pet (a theory based upon my pet dog) senses the importance of grades not just in your life but in the people associated with your life, as well, including the milkman (let’s not forget the newspaperman, mailman, etc.).

Consider grades as the least-liked character in your favorite movie or web series. Your feelings towards that particular character act like a chameleon, and your feelings towards your grades are no different. The relationship that we have with grades is subjective. It is dependent on the student and the professor, and the effect of it is dependent on the mood of your respective guardians (unless you burn it if it’s not enough).

The hate-love relationship

Our journey with grades officially begins when our parents leave us at an unknown place full of other kids and some adults. The seed of ‘progress is directly related to numbers’ is sown somewhere deep in the mind. With time, along with one’s physical and mental growth, the seed starts to develop as well. Are you able to imagine that grade plant somewhere in your mind whose life and death are connected to your life?

The plant cannot be perceived as a virus but that doesn’t make it an antibody as well. So what is it? 

The plant is nothing but the byproduct of human’s desperate efforts to measure things systematically, to give each and everything a rank, so that it could come under our nomenclature. It does sound a bit dramatic but have you ever analyzed the effects of such simple concepts? Now is the time.

The never-ending debate over grades

Have you ever come across statements like “I wish they forget to release the results,” or “They should conduct exams but not the evaluation process”? I don’t know about you, but I remember saying the first statement at least 4-5 times in Xth. But does that mean I hate the grading system? I don’t (because I got good grades).

+

If there was no relationship between education and evaluation, it’d be an impossible task for the students to understand their strengths and weaknesses in a particular subject, or skill, or sport. That’s how we’ve been improving our weaknesses for a long time.

The grading system proved to be an efficient, systematic, quick, and easy way for the professors, students, and their guardians. It certainly had a complete opposite and drastic effect on a student’s mental health. Indirectly or directly, the grading system or the measuring system of today made students absorb this idiotic fact that numbers define one’s success.

Readers, I’ve observed a woman, who’s a laborer, smile more than I do and that smile was real and pure. I could feel the degree of contentment in her single smile. So, numbers or grades only have power to an extent.

Adults, don’t you think it’s your responsibility to save the little ones from being suppressed by concepts like grades like you or your friends must’ve experienced? We cannot modify the grading system that is being used since the 18th century in just ten days or ten years. What we can do is teach our students this simple thing that,

‘Numbers are never going to leave you. They’ll follow you in every aspect of your life (even when you’re asleep). But that doesn’t mean they can control you. The reins are always in your hand. You just have to buckle up, stop being scared of the results or the outcomes and just focus on the working part. It is going to be a ride worth remembering.’

Conclusion

Some of you might be thinking that numbers/grades do define success, and I agree, they do. But allow me to remind you that these concepts or things are formed by us. We are to control them and not the other way around.

If you or your child, your friend, your student, or your neighbor is struggling and suffering because of grades, you’re not allowed by humanity to say ‘work hard or grow up’ or something that will make them more miserable. Help them by just being there, and let them contact a therapist if needed.

Let’s support each other not just by wearing clothes that say ‘being human’ but by actually meaning it from the heart!

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Develpoment Education Humanities

The social context of education: Are we doing enough?

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There’s a marshmallow in front of you. 

No, this isn’t a promotion, and you aren’t getting samples (sorry!), but imagine I keep a marshmallow in front of you. Of course, I will give you the classic catch. If you wait till I come back, without eating the marshmallow, you get TWO of them. The choice seems obvious, right? Wait and get two marshmallows. Or maybe you’d rather carpe diem with that one marshmallow. Either way, what does it have to do with education?

Am I merely grabbing your attention by mentioning a fluffy, sugary treat? Maybe. BUT, did you know that the decision you would make in this actual marshmallow situation could tell quite a bit about your personality? Skeptical? Good. Allow me to elaborate. 

The Marshmallow Test and Education

‘The Marshmallow Test’ written by Walter Mischel elaborates on his famous experiment with marshmallows. Not to get into too much detail, but the author discusses how those who chose to wait for the second marshmallow had higher SAT scores and better social as well as cognitive functioning. They are then seen to have a better sense of self-worth. The comparison between those who could wait, and those who couldn’t, were characterized by different brain scans in areas relating to addictions and obesity. 

So a “no” to eating the marshmallow? Nope. That’s a personal choice. But notice how behavioral patterns in children sort of projects themselves onto adolescence and above? That’s what we’re focusing on in today’s blog. 

Social context of education 

The social context of education refers to external factors that affect a child’s educational opportunities. These factors include social background, family structure, socio-economic status, the learning environment, differences and diversity in school, resource equity, and so on.

For instance, parents’ education is seen to be associated with student achievement. Likewise, the poverty levels of the school also decide the quality of education. Public school teachers in high-poverty schools are also more likely to report student misbehavior as interfering with their teaching than teachers in low-poverty schools. Students in mathematics classes in low-poverty public secondary schools are more likely to be taught by teachers who majored or minored in mathematics than were students in high-poverty public secondary schools.  

As discussed, many factors can affect the learning process. The social context in which schools operate can influence their effectiveness. Changes in social context present challenges that schools must address to enhance their effectiveness and ensure that educational progress can occur. 

The impact of social context on education

The point to focus on is that the social environment that the child is subject to in education has a holding on their personality development. This social environment can consist of various levels such as family, institutional, community, and society. An environment in which children don’t feel safe or are victims to be bullying will have an impact that carries on into adulthood.

The mental health of the learners and their ability to deal with emotions does make a connection to this. A survey shows that 13% of students in America are stressed, 22% suffer anxiety, 20% have sleep difficulties, and 14% have depression. All of this has a direct influence on the performance of a learner. (Read more about the link between mental health and students here

Is this the social context we want in our education systems? What are we subjecting our children to?

Imagine 12-year-olds consuming content on social media where they think beauty filters are the new norm. Or teens on apps that scam them of money. Even the shady man trying to befriend an unknowing adolescent by “sliding into the DMs.” Families making learners believe that their value solely depends on education, or vice versa—that education has no value. All of this comes under the umbrella of social context. And if it is not safe, we are directly subjecting learners to the negative impact that it can have. 

Are we really okay with learning in this environment? 

social context of education
Photo by LUM3Non Unsplash

Conclusion 

While we can’t micromanage the system, we can influence it. Promoting a healthier social context in education, general check-ins, being empathetic of the learner, and not putting them in a tight box roped with expectations are some ways to give them room to grow. This environment is shaping them in numerous ways—how they interact with other elements of the community, survival systems, ideologies, and so on and so on. 

Should something so impactful get so little attention? Are we doing enough? 

Categories
Education Learning

In-Person learning vs Online learning: Which is for you?

Wondering what to expect from the move from In-person learning to online learning courses? E-learning has never been as important and used as it is today.

Since around 2010, smartphones have provided more options for learning anytime, anywhere — whether traveling, taking public transportation, in the waiting room, or at home.

In 2020, the global COVID-19 pandemic, with its lockdowns and restrictions, brought the range of available online education to the focus of our attention.

Does this online renaissance make in-person training obsolete? Can online learning replace In-person learning? What are the pros and cons? How to make this transition sustainable and successful? Read on to answer these questions and discover the next steps from In-person to online learning on your own. In this blog, we will take a look at the advantages and disadvantages of the main learning methods.

What is in-person learning?

For most of us, learning starts with lessons in a classroom with a teacher, where we are physically present (and supposedly attentive). Despite the current pandemic, this method is still the most widely used way to learn and absorb new knowledge.

One of the undeniable advantages of In-person teaching is the physical presence of the teacher, where their personality and the ability to interact with them are very important. Anecdotes, jokes, cultural references, etc.— every teacher has their own style and personality.

In a classroom, teachers are constantly adapting what they say and their daily activities based on the needs and reactions of students. By responding appropriately, a teacher can improve participants’ knowledge retention and motivate them.

Finally, there is the concept of interaction. If the group is not too large, it can promote discussion, healthy competition, and mutual help. Continuous communication with the teacher gives every student the opportunity to expand their knowledge and express their curiosity.

What is online learning?

Online learning is exactly what it sounds like—learning that takes place in an online format. In online learning, a teacher generally uploads personalized content to learning management software (LMS) and digitally shares it with their class. Access is via devices that are connected to the Internet.

Online learning offers flexibility in many ways not normally available in traditional in-person learning. Online training courses are a great option for people who work remotely or cannot attend seminars in person.

In many cases of online learning, students do not interact directly with the teacher or faculty. Many LMS offer students the ability to interact with teachers through chat rooms, forums, or email. Some even offer live online broadcasts where students can interact with the teacher while teaching the course in a live setting.

Which method is best for you: In-person or online learning?

Both in-person and online learning has advantages and disadvantages. It is important to carefully weigh the pros and cons before making a decision that will affect your education and ultimately, your career. Educational institutions need to figure out what works best for their employees’ schedules, learning needs, and overall financial situation.

Key differences

Mobility and ease of learning

Online education is by far the most mobile. You can learn for free from anywhere in the world. On the other hand, traditional education requires a more rigorous investment of time.

Human touch and personal teaching approach

In-person teaching is more up, close and personal. Education is not one size fits all. It requires a lot of personalized teaching techniques. For example, when I want to learn to play guitar, most online courses were more geared towards learning a specific song while I wanted to learn how to create a song myself, and I learned it in a traditional educational system.

Communication with other students

Online learning offers many chat opportunities, discussion forums, etc., it is easy to get in touch with other students and discuss your concerns, and the chances are that most of your questions will be resolved by yourself. On the other hand, it is not so in face-to-face learning.

Conclusion

The online classes vs in-person learning debate have several aspects to look at; they both have benefits and disadvantages. However, the mixed method of coaching can be the best resolution for meeting all the students’ needs.

So to stay ahead of today’s competition, it is necessary that you combine both the education system and that will help you in lots of ways.

Categories
Develpoment Education General

Bullying in School: Effective Ways Overcome Fear

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Has someone let you down and made you feel humiliated in front of others? Is there someone who makes you feel like you have to win or pay to protect yourself from them?

It hurts!

Before starting this article, I want to share one incident with you all. This incident is from my school days. I use to keep quiet. Can you guess why? I was a wallflower because I used to stammer! My classmates made fun of me whenever I spoke. Even the teachers did not allow me to read because I stammered a lot. I think you must have understood what I am talking about?

Yes, the topic is: Bullying in School.

But wait a minute! Can’t bullying happen in college, in the workplace, and in adulthood? Yes, I think it can. I know it can.

Recently, a parent asked me, “Is it possible for a teacher to harass a student?” In essence, he was saying, “My son is being bullied by a teacher, but I don’t know what to do about it.” We have had a few negative experiences with teachers over the years and it definitely feels like bullying.

The behavior is very similar: one person tries to take power over another person in a negative, hurtful, or abusive way. So is it “bullying” for a teacher to treat a student this way?

Let’s talk about exactly what Bullying is:

The dictionary defines bullying as, “Someone who keeps doing or saying things to have power over another person.”

Let’s see the types of bullying that happens in school:
  • Verbal bullying includes name-calling, making fun of, cracking jokes at another person, etc.
  • Physical bullying includes pushing, shoving, pinching, hitting, etc.
  • Social bullying includes spreading rumors, excluding people from events, etc.
  • Cyberbullying includes disseminating private information through texts, emails, etc.

Sometimes we’re bullied by our own friends, and we don’t even realize it. You have a group of friends who are all mad at you for some reason, and they isolate you from your group. If they deliberately ignore you, you will see how they approach and do their best to show that they are ignoring you. A week later, you all become friends again and are mad at the next person.

Let’s come back to my life story of handling bullying. I had two options: either to give up and remain that shy, lonely, introverted person or to overcome the fear of bullying.

I chose the second option, and now I really feel delighted about choosing that step at that time. Although, I have been bullied for approximately 6-7 years.

Below are the methods I have taken to overcome bullying. You can do the same.

Do not resort to direct attack

Never resort to direct attack or bullying if someone intimidates you because that is what the person bullying wants. He wants you to act up and defend yourself, and if you do so, you are only going to suffer.


“Don’t bully a bully, because, in the end, you will become a bully yourself.”

Tell the bully to stop and walk away calmly

Believe it or not, it can be very effective. Practice what you have to say with a friend, an adult, or yourself in front of the mirror. Practice speaking firmly and directly with confidence in your voice. Tell others that you think you can earn respect, and encourage others to stand up for themself.

Talking to adults

We are often afraid to tell someone because we don’t want to appear weak or ashamed. Don’t keep it in your heart! Just share it with someone you trust very much like your parents, friends, cousins, etc.

It sounds intimidating at first, but adults can help you stop bullying and fix it. You are not guilty of anything; the person bullying you is. So don’t let your self-doubt and sense of guilt stop you from confiding in loved ones.

Understand that it’s not your fault

Nobody deserves to be bullied! Don’t blame yourself. Whatever happens in life, you are not to blame for being bullied. We live in a society in which we are confronted with stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination. None of us are left from facing these social grievances. Bullies intimidate because they can. Make it so that they can’t

Be strong!

Whatever the situation is in life, always stand courageously. Face the fear. Be in control so the harasser doesn’t have it. If you are confident and behave you don’t care, no one will be able to bring you down with harsh words and actions.
You are not alone; we’re all stuck in this together.

This is how I coped up with bullying. I believe that you and many others like you and me can too.

In a Nutshell

If another student is bullying your child, or if you see a teacher abusing power, report each incident to the school so that it can be recorded. Meet directly with the school administration. Also, interact with a positive attitude and make it clear that you want a positive outcome for your child. After all, all children deserve a safe environment where they will NOT be bullied or abused.

Categories
Education Learning

The Learning Systems Needs to be Updated! Here’s Why

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If 2020 has made one thing painfully clear is that schools and universities need to update their learning systems. Now more than ever!!

Hey, folks. This is going to be a more serious article. If I come up with some spicy jokes, you are going to see them, but I am going to try and maintain the seriousness for this one.

With 2020 and the shifting of education to a more online mode, the curriculum and syllabus were modified. However, what education needs right now is an overhaul.

Throughout the years there have been many reports of how learning systems in many parts of the world have become obsolete—most of these criticisms are directed towards the American and Indian school systems.

A tale of two learning systems

To understand the problems in these learning systems, here is an article by Students 4 Social Change, a Forum link for Quora, and one by The Asian Age.

I recommend going through the links since they expertly highlight the problems of our system.

Interestingly enough, the Indian and American systems suffer from different problems—the problems that seem to be present in most learning systems.

The problem in the American System stems from ‘the one size fits all’ mentality, where the method of teaching has not changed for centuries and the way information is conveyed has been the same.

In India, the system has changed from its European origins along with the fact that the country entertains multiple Boards of Education which bring different systems with them [CBSE, ISCE, State, etc].

The problem in India is despite the many boards, all of them follow the exam-based approach to education; not to mention the amount of corruption that has brought the system to its knees.

Both these systems have different problems. However, both sets of problems stem from the fact that these systems are OLD.

Please note that India and America were used as examples to show the problems that exist within many systems. No system is perfect but that implies that we must at least try. In many ways, the criticisms of the American system still do not reduce it from the fact that it is still one of the premier learning systems in the world.

Better learning systems

One learning system that receives a lot of praise and is generally considered one of the best systems of education across the world is Finland’s System.

Emphasis on foundational basics is an important reason why Finland has the best education system in the world. Students get time and scope to build the best foundation and basics at their own pace. This is mixed with a lack of standardized testing, the discouragement of mugging, and supportive technology with little to no homework

In short, Finland goes in the complete opposite direction from other countries in terms of Education. The results are proof that other countries need to adopt a system derived from them. Here is an article by World Economic Forum on it and why it is the best. P.S. apart from Finland, Japan is also given praise for its system.

An appointed time

There is no doubt that the current education systems are not molding the future of students in any good way. While a lot of criticisms do carry on to universities, school is where the problems show their ugly head the most.

It’s time that we change the system. With our current situation demanding change, there has never been a more important time to change the way education takes place.

It is obvious that education is not going to be the same moving forward, with online classes becoming more frequent even in a Post-Covid World and teachers using apps and expecting assignments through emails rather than hand-ins.

Conclusion

Nothing much to add here; I took examples, shared articles, and did my best to explain why we need change; and well if you still do not believe me you can just ask Elon Musk about it. Tweet him, c’mon!

There are a ton of videos available where the billionaire can be seen criticizing the system; here is an example.

Anyway, Safe Travels Friend.

Categories
Education General

Student’s dreams and parents: Who should be in control?

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Can you recall the gap between clearing 12th and joining a college? I mean, of course, you can but would you? For some students, that gap turned out to be the most frustrating time of their lives. But for others, who planned and knew their next step, that gap was nothing but an exciting break between them and their dream.

Thanks to all these modern movies, school is now portrayed as a place where you create memories; create a healthy relationship with teachers and fellow classmates; bunk classes; hide in the bathrooms; skip morning assemblies (this is okay only if your school is frying you under the sun, not-really-kidding); laugh at the wrong moment, etc. But do these reasons justify the entire significance of schools?

Student’s dreams: An ignored concept

The reasons I mentioned above, popularized by movies, are all valid. But there is one thing/question that isn’t popularized enough by both movies and teachers. What about after school? And the answer cannot be an astronaut or a pilot or a bus conductor (the last one belongs to me) just because these professions are famous.

The technique, importance, and planning in choosing one’s career path aren’t popularized enough. It usually gets pushed under a pile of reasons; as a result, most of us fail to see it until the last minute and that gives parents the power to decide the future dream of their child.

Student’s dreams crushed by parents

Parents want what’s best for their child but sometimes this concern breaks certain barriers and forms dark goggles in front of their eyes and conscience. They forget or overlook what exactly their child dreams about doing in the future. This is a very common problem in eastern style upbringing—a much underrated, toxic, and deteriorating issue.

If we compare the eastern style of upbringing children adapted by parents to that of western, we’ll observe that the eastern style leans towards the authoritarian side. On the other hand, the western style of upbringing children is more on the liberal side.

Parents who adopt the eastern style of upbringing are very strict and tend to pressure their children when it comes to grades. Their expectations from their kids are set at such levels that the child fails to touch, which results in his/her self-esteem getting seriously damaged. The concept of ‘dream job’ or ‘doing something which makes the person happy’ gets thrown under the bus.

Note: I’m not criticizing or favoring either of the styles but if you’re a parent who’s reading this, please remember that concepts like Intelligence Quotient (IQ) depends on the genetic and environmental factors influencing from the prenatal period itself. In short, you cannot force it on your child.

It’s not yours but your kid’s future!

Parents tend to force their children towards fields they like. It’s either because they couldn’t fulfill their dreams in the field or the family has been in that particular field for a long time. What about your kids’ future? What do they want? Are you sure you are not projecting your own dreams onto your children? If you are, do you realize the effect of this on their self-esteem and development as individuals? Lastly, do you really want to preach the ‘follow the crowd’ philosophy to your kid? These are some questions parents must ask themselves when parenting.

While it’s natural to have dreams for your children, don’t forget to take into account that ultimately it is their life and future. Children are taught that ‘consent is the key’. Don’t they get a say in what mould they want their future to take shape into? That’s something I leave you to answer by yourself.

Conclusion

Parenting can be hard, especially when you have had a vision for your family. To all the parents out there, I understand you must’ve dreamt of your child in certain uniforms or on a rolling chair. But remember the fact that it’s their future. Isn’t having a say in their future their fundamental right to have a say in it?

Categories
Develpoment Education

Why is Moral Development Necessary in Children?

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“Actions speak louder than words” is an aphorism that can be used when considering moral reasoning versus moral behavior. It is one thing to have good intentions and good thinking and another to make good decisions in the heat of the moment. It is often too easy to come up with excuses and get carried away on those ‘solid priorities’.

Most people agree that morality is important and needs to be taught. But the consensus soon breaks down when it comes to what it is and how to teach it.

The question here is why moral development is necessary and how it relates to child development. In my opinion, developing morals is not a one-day process, but a process that lasts a lifetime. Just as we need food to sustain our bodies, we also need moral values ​​to sustain our minds and souls.

Along with moral development, emotional development is also necessary.

What is morality?

Morality is “the recognition of the distinction between good and evil or between right and wrong; respect for and obedience to the rules of right conduct; the mental disposition or characteristic of behaving in a manner intended to produce good results.”

Moral development is the process by which children develop appropriate attitudes and behaviors towards other people in society based on norms, social and cultural rules, and laws.

Let’s understand the process in detail

Levels of moral development in children

Moral development in children is gradual as they grow from infancy to adolescence and beyond. There are 5 main levels of moral development in children.

Infants (up to 2 years)

Infants cannot moralize. Their sense of right and wrong depends on their feelings and desires. After nine months in the womb, the baby expects parental care, so his sense of justice depends on whether or not his needs are met. Hunger and loneliness are uncomfortable feelings for your baby and don’t feel right. Being cared for, hugged, and fed feels good, while lack of response is scary and wrong.

Toddlers (2 to 3 years)

At this age, your toddler realizes that others have rights and needs as well. However, he has not yet understood the difference between good and bad.

Feelings of guilt are based on empathy and moral behavior. Depending on the actions conveyed by the parents, the young child understands that obedience is the norm.

Your toddler knows it’s wrong to take a toy from a sibling just because they might get into trouble. They understand why it is wrong to hit someone because they know that they will be punished for it. Thus, your child will tend to follow the rules to avoid punishment.

Preschoolers (3 to 5 years)

This is the age at which your child internalizes family values. Since rules and regulations are essential to the family discipline, they become important to your child as well. Your child expects the elderly or parents to take responsibility. They understand the role of a “child” and an “adult” and hope that they will be brought to maturity.

The child realizes that actions have consequences: “If I do this, it will happen.” The positive direction of the parents makes the child bond well and behave well. The separated child will do what they want unless and until they are caught.

Kids (7-10 years)

After the age of 7, children start questioning if the people who hold authoritative positions, such as teachers and parents, are infallible.
Your child will develop a strong sense of what he should and should not do. They would want to participate in making rules.

Children of this age develop a sense of fairness and understand the necessity of rules. They understand that children also have rights and filter the rules according to their best interests

Adolescents (11- 16 years)

As they reach adulthood, children begin to develop their own moral values ​​as they question and analyze those imposed by their parents. Your teen will broaden his or her moral horizons and see rules as a set of social guidelines that benefit everyone.

They value the rules, but they also negotiate. They take an interest in what is generally good for society, as they develop their abstract thinking skills. Your teen will begin to realize that the decision they are making affects those around them.

Your youngster wants to be accepted by his peers and can change his values ​​and morals.

Summing Up

Moral Development is about learning ‘values about love!’

Love expresses itself in its connections with one and all. It is a proper means of expression when there is a common essence at an individual, as well as, at its indefinable most universal level.

Good morale is the foundation of every society that will have the power to survive and last. Without appropriate moral development, society is bound to crumbles and education becomes obsolete. What are your views on this? Let us know in the comments below.